Issue: February 2017
 
Home       
 COVER STORY
 
 
  Demonetisation – A look back at the last two months by Shri Arun Jaitely
  The lead article is by Minister of Finance and Corporate Affairs, Government of India.
  From a Cash Economy to a Less – Cash Economy by Pravakar Sahoo and Amogh Arora
  The Second lead article is by Associate Professor, Institute of Economic Growth (IEG)
  Demonetisation- Impacting Elections – by S.Y.Quraishi
  The Focus article of the issue talks about the impact of Demonetisation on Elections and the author is hopeful that cashless transactions will ensure higher level of transparency and scrutiny.
  Less Cash Economy: India Vis-à-vis the World by Arpita Mukherjee, Tanu M.Goyal
  The Special Article talks about the benefits of less cash economy for India and the Global scenario.
  Achieving a Cashless Rural Economy – by Sameera Saurabh
  This article is by Director, (Plan & Policy) Ministry of Rural Development
Lead Article

The lead article by Kiren Rijiju, Union Minister of State for Home Affairs discusses the Sendai Framework on disaster risk reduction and the initiatives taken by the government of India to implement the Framework ....

read more...
 
 
When the Prime Minister announced demonetisation

When the Prime Minister announced demonetisation of 500 and 1000 rupee notes on the night of 8th November 2016, the first reaction all over the country was one of stunned disbelief. The main objective of this move was to curb black money, corruption and fake money menace. In India demonetisation was undertaken twice in the past, once in 1946 and the second time in 1978. However, during both those times, the Indian economy was not so vibrant. The notes demonetised were of high denominations with very few people having access to these high denomination notes and hence not much hardship was faced by the common man. However, the present demonetisation announcement had widespread repercussions. The 500 and 1000 rupee notes being the most widely circulated denominations, their demonetisation left people with no cash in hand even to purchase daily perishables like bread, milk and eggs, vegetables and fruits. The only fact that actually gave the common man solace was the stated purpose of the demonetisation i.e. unearthing of black money and curbing of terror financing. Another motive of the government in demonetisation was to create a cashless economy. Cashless transactions have the benefit of transparency i.e. all transactions can be traced and tracked. This helps the government to track payment to terrorist organizations and other anti-national activities. One major cause for concern in the less cash economy has, however, been the danger of cyber crimes. While, the digital methods reduce the risks involved in carrying cash, they are prone to cyber security risks. At the same time there are definite solutions to handle cyber crimes. Digitisation of the economy has been undertaken in various countries with some being successful and some not very successful. The most successful effort so far, has been in Sweden. How successful it will be in India will depend on how much awareness is created among India’s vast illiterate and semi-literate population, especially in rural areas, who have virtually no or very less access to internet. With effective government policies to deal with cyber security issues and large scale awareness drives to educate people, one can hope to see India become a global player in the digital economy.
 
 
Regional Languages
Hindi
English
News & Events
Regular Column
J&K Window :
Do you know? : What is Forensic Auditing
Forensic auditing refers to the auditing with the main aim to employ accounting techniques and methods to gather evidence to investigate the crimes on financial front such as theft, fraud etc.
Copyright © 2008 All rights reserved with Yojana Home  |  Disclaimer  |  Contact